Snapchat Technology by Mary

This is a continued exploration of the theme I touched on in Project 2: social media sharing, particularly what we choose to show and what we choose to omit. On Snapchat, the app that allows you to momentarily share images with whomever you choose, added a new function called My Story, where you can upload multiple photos that can be viewed by everyone in your social network.

In showing someone else’s story—a fictional someone in this case—I thought it might be interesting to show a very true and raw and emotive story through a lens that tends to be rather rosy. The story being told is in some ways just as real as the Snapchat Stories we all see each time we open the app, but isn’t what we’re used to seeing. This is the mirror of the real Snapchat Stories or social media posts of any kind that we see. For every boastful or happy or artsy post, there are just as many sad and anguished and unpoetic moments. These are the ones we don’t post, the ones we all have but never share.

 

Mary Gruben

http://www.mary-gruben.com/

Project3_1 Project3_2 Project3_3 Project3_4 Project3_5 Project3_6 Project3_7

Critiques

Amanda: Love that you decided to continue on with your previous project and to explore this subject matter even deeper. One thing I struggled to grasp was what “story” exactly you were trying to tell. Through the text it echoed a lost relationship, the pain of a one-sided breakup & the destructive decisions one makes in the aftermath. However, it would seem that these snapchats are directed to another individual, not necessarily a Snapchat Story. That being said, I thought the photos captured a strong and consistent emotion. Photos 2, 3 and 6 struck me the most because of how simple yet revealing the statements were. I particularly like the unedited feel of these photos. A person who is struggling and depressed isn’t going to take the time to correctly expose or edit a photo – it certainly had a sense of “Why should I care?” One small nit would have been to save these photos down rather than take screenshots in the edit version.

Beatrice: This is a very different perspective on how Snapchat is normally viewed. It’s usually a tool to send silly pictures and captions, but I love how you used it to capture the other side of someone’s life that’s not so carefree and happy; I really got a sense of the pain this person is going through. I particularly liked photos 2 and 7 because of the sarcasm and dryness of the caption plus the image – it’s something that realistically could even be someone’s Snapchat. I actually would have preferred if some of the captions were more casually written and less “poetic”, if you will, just to keep the informality that is associated with Snapchat. But overall, I enjoyed this series and am curious to know more about this person’s story.

Stephen: SnapChat is an awesome new tool – and I like how you have continued from your previous post- it shows a real development of your story at TPC. I was sad reading your story. I actually read it backwards first and it gave me a whole new meaning when I got the intended story from you! Really nicely done. I didn’t like the captions over the images all that much – it would have been nicer to associate a phrase with the image – but it does keep in them with SnapChat!!

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